FAQs

Yes. We represent clients all over the United States and in other countries as well. We can talk to you over email, video conferencing, telephone, text or fax. You will be able to send me documents and files to the folder we will share with you once we begin your case. If you can’t upload them, you can send them via mail as well. As a US territory, you can send letters and packages to Puerto Rico at domestic rates through the US Postal Service, and you can send packages through UPS, DHL and FEDEX as well.

Although this person, which might refer to him/herself as an “immigration consultant” or a “notario”, might be interested in giving honest services, if they are giving legal advice, and they are not licensed attorneys, they are probably engaged in the “unauthorized practice of law” or “notario fraud”, which is a crime. These persons are not authorized to give legal advice, and in most cases, are actually just interested in making money and ripping you off. I have met with people who have paid in some cases thousands of dollars to these individuals, and acted on their legal advice, which turned out to not only be completely false, but also landed them in deportation proceedings, and in a couple of cases, deported. Consequently, this is a significant problem that must be taken very seriously.
If you have already hired a non-lawyer for immigration legal advice or representation, and she/he did not help you and now will not give you your money back, I encourage you to file a complaint against this person with the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”). You can file a complaint anonymously with them, and they will not ask any questions about your immigration status when you do so. You can file the complaint at https://ftccomplaintassistant.gov/Information?OrgCode=#crnt&panel1-1. I can help you file this complaint when we meet for a consultation.  During this time, I would also review your case, and see what we can do to ensure that you remain legally in the country and that this person’s acts don’t harm you or your family.
It is important that we stop notarios who prey on the immigrant community’s desire for legal certainty and safety, and rob them of their hard earned money, and often put people like you at risk of deportation and permanent separation from family and friends. If this happened to you, please call me. I would like to help you.
Immigration in the US is considered to be a “federal matter”. This means that, in order to be able to practice it, you must be an attorney licensed in at least one state or the District of Columbia, or be accredited as a Representative by the Board of Immigration Appeals (which means that the person must be working for a non-profit organization).
I am licensed to practice in Puerto Rico, New York, Washington DC and Maryland. You can find my information at http://iapps.courts.state.ny.us/attorney/AttorneyDetails?attorneyId=5628587 and http://www.ramajudicial.pr/orientacion/dir-abogados.html.
Anytime you are meeting with a person offering you legal advice, it is very important that you ask them in what state they are licensed to practice law. If they do not want to tell you, that most likely means they are not a lawyer, and you should not hire them. If they tell you that they have a “federal license”, but not one from a state, this person is most likely not a lawyer because there is no such thing as a “federal law license”. In this case, the person using this excuse is most likely violating the law, committing notario fraud, and you are at risk of being defrauded.

I am well aware that all too often, people decide to self-represent themselves in their case because they believe that they can’t afford an attorney. However, trying to save some money at the start of your case could end up costing you a lot of money down the line. In some cases, it might cost you your freedom and life in this country, as you could make a mistake that could put you in deportation proceedings.

I want to help you avoid this tragic fate. I am committed to providing professional, competent, and ethical legal services, and will always provide you with reasonable and easy to understand rates without any hidden charges.
I was born and raised in Puerto Rico, and first came to the United States to study at Marquette University in Milwaukee, WI. Although I loved the Midwest, the winters were too cold, so, after graduating from Business Administration, I returned to Puerto Rico. I went to law school there, and graduated in 1999. I eventually returned to the United States, this time, to Washington, DC, in January 2001, to study a Master’s Degree in International Legal Studies at American University. After graduating, I stayed working full time in the United States. You can read my bio here for more information on what I’ve done professionally.
On a personal note, I enjoy long-distance running, having run five marathons and several half-marathons. If you are a runner yourself, I would love to hear your running stories.